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A Question Answered and Another Posed

The Flour Mill Cupola

In last week’s Bill’s History Corner, I was discussing the Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. Flour mill. Someone asked a good question, and because I think I know the answer, I’ll try to answer the question here this week. It was “What was the little cupola on the top of the mill for?

The cupola is high on top of the building for a reason. The small building-like structure is to protect the machinery inside the cupola. This machinery inside is the central elevator or leg that lifts the grain from the unloading area to the top, then dumps the grain into shoots that allow the grain to slide into storage bins. The reason it is on the top is so gravity can pull the grain downward into the different storage bins that were on the top floor. Gravity doesn’t cost anything to use. All the bins can’t be in the same place, so the elevator needs to dump out the grain into shoots higher than the bins so gravity can take it to bins farther away from the center elevator. These shoots, they were wooden at this time, were angled away from the main elevator. The higher the elevator the farther away the shoot could slide the grain. If the grain shoot was too close to horizontal the grain would not flow smoothly and backup. You can see examples of this all over the Indiana countryside.

Some modern farmers that have several of their own storage bins also have an elevator type tool in the middle of the bins that lifts the grain to a higher point where it is dumped in shoots to slide into the different bins. It was the same principle at the flour mill, only they built a small building around the machinery to protect it from the weather.  Sure looks cute in this picture, doesn’t it?

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A New Mystery for This Week

This week’s History Corner is a small Puzzle. Hopefully, someone can help us out here and give us a bit more information so we can understand what was going on in 1909 & 1910. Possibly for many other years also, but we have not searched for other years for this company’s receipts yet.

As you can see by the scan below, this receipt Dated December 2nd, 1909 is from the “Office of INDIANA STATE CHEMIST, Agricultural Experiment Station, LAFAYETTE, IND.  To W. J. Jones, Jr. State Chemist. DR.     I only listed the purchase lines from the other receipts, as the bill heads are the same.

We have found seven receipts (see list below) for this 12 – month time period. All the receipts are for “100# (100 pound) TAGS” either the No. 2609 or the No. 2610 TAGS. What were these tags for and why did the C, Z & M Co. need to order them from this INDIANA STATE CHEMIST at the AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, in LAFAYETTE, IND? Was Purdue involved in the INDIANA STATE CHEMIST at LAFAYETTE?  Inquiring minds want to know.

Boy-o-Boy, if we only had one of these tags, maybe that would tell us something. As a guess, I would think this would have something to do with the Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. Flour Mill. The receipt does have the name   “AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION” printed on it. The Flour Mill is certainly more agricultural related than the cabinet shops. Could this puzzle be as simple as the C, Z & M Co. needed to send samples of some of their products to the office of the INDIANA STATE CHEMIST for detailed testing before they could put a STATE tag on it for sale? Sort of like the GOOD HOUSEKEEPING SEAL OF APPROVAL, only this tag was for either a type of flour or another product they were making. If anyone has an answer to this puzzle, please let us know your thoughts.

December 31th, 1909 – – For 1875, 100# tags  No. 2610  = $15.00

March——   3rd. 1910 – – For 2500, 100# tags   No. 2609  = $20.0

August ——-7th, 1909 – – For 2500, 100# tags   No. 2609 = $20.00

      “                “        “    – – For 2500, 100# tags   No. 2610 = $20.00

May  ———5th, 1910 – – For 2500, 100# tags   No. 2609 = $20.00

    “                   “       “    – – For 2500, 100# tags  No. 2610 = $20.00

December 15th, 1910 – –  For 2500, 100# tags  No. 2610 = $20.00

December 21th, 1910 – – For 3125, 100# tags  No. 2609 = $25.00

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Thoughts on the CZ&M Flour Mill

Welcome to another Bill’s History Corner. Today we are looking at three items associated with the Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. flour mill.

  • A picture of the actual Coppes, Zook & Mutschler flour mill is credited to the Nappanee center. They have always been generous with sharing their early pictures. Thank You.
  • A Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. postcard with prices of 10 their products
  • A receipt from THE NAPPANEE NEWS. THE NEWS BOOKSTORE. Gordon N. Murray, Proprietor.

This photo of the mill was shot before the streets were laid with brick in 1909, and before some of the additions to the flour mill building were added. You can clearly see a huge pile of wood (cutoffs and scraps from the C, Z & M  sawmill) that was intended for use as fuel in the boiler to make the steam that powered the engine that turned the equipment that ground the flour and other products. There are not many houses in the background. I love old pictures like this. I have looked closely with my magnifying glass. Have you noticed the wood board sidewalks?

Baking with Perfection

This particular postcard (above) was intended to be mailed to customers and was used as a company record. Someone has written on the back side the date of “9/10/10” and “Received from the news printing Office, ——-  Jay”. The card has “PRICES CURRENT” listed for 10 of the company’s products. There were four brands of Flour and five items that I think were animal feed, which was priced by the ton. PERFECTION flour in paper or cloth sacks was priced at $5.40 and $5.55 per barrel.

How large a quantity is a barrel and how much does a barrel weigh you may ask. The answer is in the details. The illustration of the flour bag has a weight of 24 ½ LBS printed on it, and at the bottom of the bag are the words “one-eighth barrel”. So, the answer is found by multiplying 24 ½ lbs. by 8 to find the weight of a barrel of Perfection flour. The answer is 196 LBS in one barrel. That does not mean they packed the bags in a wooden barrel before they sold them; a barrel was the unit price that flour was sold in. If you only wanted one paper bag of flour, divide $5.40 by eight and that will be the price for one bag. ($0.67). You could bake a lot of pies with one bag of flour. In 1910 the baking practices in the normal American household were much different than nowadays. Ever wonder why the flour bins in early Coppes kitchen cabinets were so big? The reason was that most households did their own baking and needed large amounts of flour.

I like the catchy phase on the right side of the card.      “IT PLEASES THE USERS

Besides publishing The Nappanee News Newspaper, this company also did a huge amount of printing for local companies. I would be hard pressed to name all the different types of printed material that The Nappanee News did just for the Coppes companies.

Nappanee News Stationery

The receipt below is typical of the 100s of The Nappanee News receipts that we have in the Coppes paper collection. I don’t know how it happened, but it appears that most of the company’s business receipts for the years (approx.) 1902 to 1915 were stored in small file boxes that somehow survived in the factory buildings till now. Think about it, these boxes survived company moves, room cleanups, trash days, public auctions and they are still here for us to learn some of this history.

The date of this receipt does not match exactly with the date of the postcard (I’m taking liberties), but I’m sure there is one somewhere, we just have not found it yet. This Nappanee News receipt is dated Feb. 1, 1905, and lists several printing jobs for one month that the News did for the C, Z & M Co. If you add together the number of postcards printed in this one receipt you will find the answer is 2,000 cards. That is a lot of mail.

The 1st line reads,  Jan 15 – To one doz. Pencils — 60 —             -was this Office supplies?

The 2nd. Line reads    Jan. 12 – printing 1,000 Postal Cards, one form, Flour Mill – 1.25

The 3rd. line reads     Jan. 12 – Printing 500 postal Cards, one form, Flour mill – .75

The 4th line reads        Jan 12 – 25,000 Finish??? Reports, chemy folo  —        8.75

The 5th line reads      Jan 12 – printing 500 P. Cards, 3 forms, Flour Mill   —       1.75

The 6th line reads       Jan. 19 —  500 Lumber Tally Sheets, print paper   —           1.75

The 7th line reads      Jan. 26   – 1,000 Kene?  Statements                    —                2.50

The 8th line reads       Jan. 26   – 1,000 – No. 6 Blank tags                   —                 .75

                                                                                                                                                    $18.10

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Worlds Fair Houses Part II

And now for an update on last week’s Bill’s History Corner.

I love it when people contact us about some part of a History Corner. In this case, we were notified that there were five houses at the Chicago Worlds Fair in 1933, and they have had an interesting history after the fair ended. I hope you will excuse me for not knowing more about these houses, but I have only lived in Indiana for 12 years.

I contacted Indiana landmarks with a question about these Worlds Fair houses and their response is below. There are three web addresses for you to look at in the response email.  If you are interested, you can also look at these homes (now private residences) with Google maps here: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6841349,-87.0013551,3a,75y,354.07h,76.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1se8uNABR05PD8orNy0WRdgQ!2e0!7i3328!8i1664

Does anyone want to tackle the House of Tomorrow? Talk about a one of a kind house! See you next week, same time same place.   I hope. Thanks.   

A Note from Indiana Landmarks

“Hi Bill, Thank you for contacting Indiana Landmarks. There are five Century of Progress homes in the Indiana Dunes National Park. Indiana Landmarks works in partnership with the National Park Service to lease the homes to individuals who have funded restoration and preservation of each. We host a tour each September (tickets will go on sale in August on a yet-to-be-announced date). Here are some links with more information on the homes: 

https://www.indianalandmarks.org/2016/09/century-of-progress-homes-

indiana/https://www.nps.gov/indu/learn/historyculture/centuryofprogress.htm (see the links at the bottom of the page for each home) 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_of_Progress_Architectural_District 

One home has yet to be restored, the House of Tomorrow. We are currently requesting proposals from individuals interested in taking on the project. You can read more about that home here: https://www.indianalandmarks.org/about/house-of-tomorrow/ 

If you’d like to receive email updates on our tours & events which will include notification of dates related to the Century of Progress tour you can subscribe here:https://www.indianalandmarks.org/e-newsletter-signup/  

Thanks,………………………………
Jessica Kramer
Executive Assistant
………………………………
Indiana Landmarks
www.indianalandmarks.org

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Coppes & Zook at the 1933 World’s Fair

“A Century of Progress, 1933,” or “Chicago World’s Fair,” 1933, take your pick. Each name is for the same thing. We recently purchased a 36-page booklet titled The Florida Home at A CENTURY OF PROGRESS 1933.

It seems that the state of Florida (and maybe other states as well) built and furnished a model home at the Century of Progress in Chicago with Coppes and Zook furnishing the “Scientifically Designed Kitchen.” Marvin Coppes wrote an interesting 2-page spread highlighting the benefits of the Coppes and Zook kitchen that appeared in the booklet. This booklet was likely given to people who toured the home during a visit to the World’s fair. Coppes and Zook may have furnished the kitchens for other state homes, but we don’t have that information yet. This is the first booklet from the Chicago World’s Fair that we have found.

Every piece of furniture and every item of decoration is described in detail, pointing out the designer or the manufacturing company that made it. Each piece of furniture also has a numbered picture in the booklet. They talk a lot about upcoming trends. The use of metal in furniture is one example of what they considered a growing trend, so you should be sure to purchase your next furniture with metal legs or framework that is visible.  I like this line that was used often in this booklet, “Florida, where summer spends the winter.”  

One of the last paragraphs in the booklet reads,” The many who have been thru the Florida tropical Home and secured this booklet may, upon reflection in the quiet of their home, away from conflicting reactions due to the numerous exhibits taken in—desire to purchase some of the items in the home or be desirous of building a similar house. Because of the fact that the Florida tropical home is built and sponsored by the State of Florida, we are unable to include prices in this book.”

“However, we will be pleased to give you complete information concerning all details of furniture and other items, in which you may be interested, together with prices on all articles, delivered to your station or post office. When writing, kindly give brief description of the particular things in which you are interested and the illustration number.”

The kitchen in the Florida house is of Coppes & Zook’s modern style with one countertop on several base cabinets and wall cabinets. Coppes & Zook were producing this “modern” style cabinet while still manufacturing the Hoosier Style cabinets till approximately 1944. I don’t really know when the last ‘Hoosier Style” cabinet left the Coppes factory. Sometime during the Second World War is my guess.

As a sidebar, if you do a Google search for “century of progress Chicago” you will be able to see dozens of art deco style posters from the fair, like the following one. I love this time period. Thanks for your visit to Bill’s History Corner.

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Coppes & Zook Office Girls

Today we are looking at two pictures that were labeled “Coppes & Zook office girls.” As you can see, one of the photos is taken in a park-like setting, perhaps someone’s celebration day. Birthdays, anniversary, 4th of July, the list is endless. But, the real reason my writing about these women is that there aren’t any names attached to the pictures. Someone in this photo could be your ancestor. Do you recognize anyone? Can you put names with any of the pictures? Do you have a copy of this same picture in your photo album? Do you know when or where it was taken? I want to learn the answers to all those questions. I hope you can help.

The Coppes & Zook Co. name was used during two different time periods. The first time they used the Coppes Bros. & Zook co. name was from approx. 1890 till the partnership with the Mutschler Brothers began in 1902. This was the period when Daniel Zook was working with Frank & John Coppes. The 2nd time the company used the Coppes Bros. & Zook Co. name was after the partnership dissolved in 1912. In 1912 after Daniel Zook died, the Mutschler Brothers (Albert & Charles) returned to their former factory and Daniel’s son Harold, became the Zook in the company name, Coppes Bros. & Zook Co.

The company just was not large enough to need that many women working in the offices during the first time period (1890-1912). During this earlier time, the company operated the box factory, the grist mill, and the sawmill with wholesale and retail sales. During the 2nd time period of Coppes Bros. & Zook (1912-1936), the company expanded the manufacturing part of the business and logically would have needed more “office girls” to keep track of time sheets, inventories, ordering, sales, salesmen, payroll, etc. The company built the little “green office building” in 1899, and by then at least had a location for ladies to work. Women, for the most part, were not part of the factory force till the 2nd World War.

That previous paragraph is my explanation for why I think the pictures of Coppes Office ladies was taken sometime during the 2nd use of the Coppes Bros. & Zook name, from 1912 – 1936. Could well have been in the late 1920s when the kitchen cabinet business was booming and there were approx. 300 factory workers. If you know any of these women, please email us to let us know. Thanks, I Need to tell you this was all Dodie’s Idea, and it was a good one.

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The Mutschler Merger and Reader Photos

Welcome to this week’s edition of Bill’s History Corner.
This is what I like to see happen.

Mr. Mark Farmwald sent this picture to us a couple of weeks ago, while he was inquiring about information that he was interested in finding. Mark’s grandfather is the 4th from the right in the top row. This is a photo of the “Machine Room” at the Mutschler Brothers Co.  After being employed at Mutschler Brothers Co. for an undetermined time, Mark’s Grandfather purchased the Home Lumber Co. in Nappanee and renamed it “Farmwald Lumber.” It appears that the picture was taken by HOPERSON PHOTO, which I’m not familiar with. Does anyone know anyone else in this picture, or even a date when this picture could have happened? Farmwald Lumber and  Home Center began operations in 1973 with the purchase of the HOME LUMBER and COAL CO.

The C,Z & M Co.

Mr. Farmwald wanted to know if we had employee records from the Mutschler Brothers Company, because his Grandfather worked at Mutschler’s Co for an unknown time period. Sorry to say, but we do not have any employee records from the Mutschler Company.

As you may remember the Coppes & Zook Co. joined with the Mutschler Brothers Co. in 1912 to form the Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Company. This combined company was the one that accelerated the production of the Kitchen Cabinets that would make the Coppes family of companies famous. Before this partnership, the Coppes & Zook Co. operated a sawmill, a flour mill and was producing wooden shipping boxes, but the shipping box business was slowing down.

When the Coppes & Zook Co. partnered with the Mutschler Brothers it gave the new company the manpower and expertise to expand their production capabilities. The Mutschler Brothers Co. was already producing a variety of furniture, including Kitchen Cabinets. The new C, Z & M Co. expanded the production of kitchen cabinets to meet the growing consumer demands. In an 1898 Nappanee furniture Company catalog, there are a couple of kitchen cabinets. This catalog is a record of the first kitchen cabinets produced in Nappanee.

Mutschler Kitchen

Here is a photo of a Mutschler Brothers Co. kitchen cabinet, produced after the partnership breakup in 1913. This Mutschler Brother’s cabinet was given to Albert Mutschler’s housekeeper as a wedding present in 1936.  Amazing things can be learned when people post their Coppes Kitchen Cabinets on our “Hoosier Cabinet Registry” here on the web site.  The Coppes family and the Mutschler family were related by marriage, so I can’t imagine there were any hard feelings between the two companies. Competition to make the better kitchen cabinets, yes, but no hard feelings.

Mutschler Employees

mutschler employees stitched

Here is a group photo of the Mutschler work force. Again, we have no names. Can anyone help us identify any of these men and the 3 ladies?

Farmwald Lumber Timeline

Here is a scan of an advertisement published In the Nappanee Advance News – Centennial Edition – Aug. 8, 1974. This advertisement may help make clearer the ownerships of the lumber company that was always located on South Main St, Nappanee. Thanks for reading.

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A New Kitchen in Seven Hours

Speedy Service

Hello everyone, thanks for looking at Bill’s History Corner. This is the place where I talk about and show vintage photos of the early Coppes factory. We welcome any and all comments. If you have something to add we want you to do just that.

Today we are looking at a two-page magazine advertisement explaining how homeowners can get a new kitchen in just 7 hours. All you needed to do was take your kitchen dimensions to a Coppes Kitchens Dealer and they would take care of everything. After you chose your style and color of cabinet, the dealers’ workmen would come and remove the old kitchen and install the new kitchen cabinets, all in less than 7 hours, or so the advertisement boasts.

A Blue Collar Kitchen

This is not the high-end kitchen cabinets that Coppes would become famous for but an economy style that was intended for people with not a lot of funds who wanted an updated kitchen. Notice that the sink was not changed. This would have saved a good amount of money on the newer kitchen. The name of this new style of Coppes kitchen is named “NAPPANEE PORTABLE UNITS”. This advertisement was aimed at homeowners and at kitchen dealers. Coppes told dealers that this was their biggest market for selling cabinets.

Changing with the Times

The first Coppes advertisement for a built-in sink cabinet was in 1937. While Coppes was still making the Kitchenet style of cabinet, they were at the same time transitioning into the built-in style cabinets. My guess is that this advertisement was produced around 1940. This was another example of the company seeing a need in the market and trying to develop a product to fill the need. Business 101.

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The “Old Crowd”

Welcome to this week’s Bill’s History Corner. This week we are looking at a photograph of Nappanee’s young people – possibly a group of young people at the M.E. Church in Nappanee. There are several prominent Nappanee names in this list. In fact, maybe some of your ancestors are here. In 1899, I would guess that almost everyone living in Nappanee had a connection with the Coppes Bros. & Zook Co. or the Nappanee Furniture Co. Except for retail stores and farming, the major employers in Nappanee were these two previously-named companies.

the old crowd 1899, group of young people from nappanee, indiana

In the front row are Lillian and Della Coppes, daughters of Samuel Coppes. Harold Zook is the 4th person in the 2nd row. Harold was Daniel ‘s son and one of the six partners, starting in 190,2 in the firm Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. (In 1899 Harold is close to finishing law school at Ann Arbor).  After the partnership with the Mutschler Bros. broke up, Harold became the Zook in the company named” Coppes Bros. & Zook” from 1912 thru 1936. In 1936, the remaining Coppes family members purchased Harold Zook’s shares in the company and then incorporated the company.

In the back row we have Bessie Coppes, daughter of Frank Coppes, next is Charles Mutschler (another partner in Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co.) In 1899, Charles was a 2nd-year student at IU in Bloomington. He married Della Coppes (front row) on June 19, 1901. A very busy person.

Again, I wish to acknowledge and thank the Nappanee Center for the use of this photograph.

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Young People of a “New” Century

“1900 Young People” is the title of this photo. You be the judge of their age. The almost-bald guy in the 4th row looks older than most of the others. This is another picture from the Nappanee center’s picture collection. We want to be sure to give them credit and a sincere thank you for allowing the use of this photo here at Bill’s History corner. Thanks to the Nappanee Center.

Like the pictures we often use, the people in this picture also has several connections to the Coppes Bros. & Zook and Mutschler Companies. The man in the front row in the dark suit is Albert Mutschler and when this photo was shot, he was the manager of the Nappanee Furniture Company. He would soon become a partner in the Coppes, Zook & Mutschler Co. The lady who is the 4th from the left in the back is Elisabeth Ulery. In 1907 Albert and Elisabeth will be married.

The handsome man on the left in the 4th row is William Rosbrough. Above William’s left shoulder is his sister Nellie. Nellie will marry Harvey Coppes who is sitting in the 2nd row right.

Above William Rosbrough’s right shoulder is Samuel Coppes’s daughter Clara. Clara and William will marry. Check out those puffy sleeves and the mustaches. Do you think the photographer told them not to smile? Wow, what a happy looking group!

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Who are Helmlinger & Bauer?

Welcome to Bill’s History Corner, where sometimes I show you I don’t know what I’m talking about. This may be one of those times. I’m showing a picture today that we have in the Coppes paper collection, but I have no idea where it came from. Maybe if I would ask everyone involved with Coppes Commons, someone might remember obtaining this picture and giving it to the collection. It does have a price of $18.00 written on the back. So if you are the person responsible for this picture, a sincere Thank You.

The picture itself is of two buildings on a dirt street with several men, ladies and children standing very still. The sign on the one building is HELMLINGER & BAUER.

This is one of those times when I wish someone had written a complete history on the back of this picture. But wait. . . there is some information written on the back! In pencil, this is on the back.  “TAKEN BEFORE 1875 UNCLE GEO. HELMLINGER + ADAM BAUER STORE, BEFORE NAPPANEE AT LOCKE.”

I think everybody knows the story of Locke and Nappanee, but here is a recap if you don’t remember: Locke was a thriving small town approx. three miles north of where Nappanee is now. When the railroad came through the new town of Nappanee in 1875-6, several Locke businesses moved lock-stock, barrel and building to Nappanee. The railroad was the key ingredient. Because of the location of the railroad, Nappanee grew and Locke didn’t.

Now I’ve got to tell you there is no mention of a Helmlinger & Bauer store in the 1880 History of Elkhart County book. More information would be wonderful. What business was conducted at this store? See the man in the top hat, talking with two other men? See the man in the dirty apron standing to the left of the door? I don’t think he is a store clerk with that apron. But what do I know is that I count at least 10 and maybe 11 children on the porch. When I enlarge the photo as much as I can there is something in the store doorway that looks like a black bear’s face. I really don’t think it is a bear, but definitely a face, maybe a big long haired dog. While I’m thinking about dogs, the two ladies in the doorway of the building to the left have what looks like a black puppy’s head at their shoulder. Can’t read the sign over the door where the ladies are standing. Could be a school, the children look to be too close to the same age to be from one family, so in my mind a school makes sense. I think I can see a new bucket hanging in the store door way, That may be a clue as to the business, also I think there are ice skates hanging in the left window.

Boy, I wish I gould go to this store and shop for myself at 1875 prices! Does anyone know more of the history related to this photo?